Law A-Level Course


Introduction to Law


Law is one of the most useful, interesting and satisfying academic subjects that you can study. You will not only learn about different areas of law, but also how the legal system operates, how law is made, how the courts work and how judges interpret law. A Level students become well versed in legal analysis which develops to a higher level if they choose to study law at university. The skills from studying Law are highly sought after by employers, especially the skills of analysis, research and communication.

In Year 12, you will study the famous English Legal System in order to gain an understanding of how law is created and applied in England and Wales. The first module focuses on the development of common law, criminal and civil court systems and legal funding. The second module includes where our law comes from.  You will study Parliament, Europe and judges, as well as who works in the law, such as solicitors, barristers, judges and magistrates.  In Year 13, you will study Criminal Law and Justice in order to gain a deeper understanding into a substantive area of law.


Teaching & Assessment


Year 12
100% written examination:
Unit 1: Legal Values (50% - 1hour 30 min)
Unit 2: Legal Reasoning (50% - 1hour 30 min)

Year 13
100% written examination:
Unit 3: Substantive Criminal Justice (50% - 1hour 30 min)
Unit 4: Criminal Justice in Context (50% 2 hours 30 min)


Vocational Progression


If you are successful on this course, A-Level Law can open up a range of exciting pathways. Not only would you be able to go to University to study in the areas of Law, Business Studies or Social Sciences, but it may also be suitable if you are interested in a career in the Civil Service, the Police, the Armed Forces, Social Work, Public Administration, Research, Banking, Journalism and Teaching.


Course Structure


Year 12


• Development of the Common Law and Equity
• Legal Values: Rule of Law; Human Rights;
• Morality European Union: Institutions and Sources
• The Criminal Process: Bail; CPS; courts
• The Civil Process: Courts; ADR
• Access to Justice: Sources of funding
• Legislation: Statutory Interpretation; delegated
• legislation Doctrine of Precedent
• Legal reasoning


Year 13


• Factors which may negate Criminal Liability:
• Defences Elements of Substantive Criminal Law:
• Homicide; Non-fatal offences
• Police Powers: Admissibility of evidence; remedies for breach of   police powers
• Principles of Criminal law and Justice: elements of a crime; Human   Rights
• Prosecution and Criminal Trial Processes: Bail;
• CPS; courts Sentencing and role of courts.